Rubber Chickens In The Arts

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Here’s another fun Library District competition I entered in 2010 using all recycled materials.  This was a challenging and fun project because it forced me to use rubber chickens in a creative way to promote reading.

I entitled my piece William Shakespeare’s “Omelet.”

I received the “Most Creative Individual” award 🙂

Materials
Stage Base: Old box painted black

Plastic Egg (on stage floor) and Rubber Chickens – “Omelet and Horatio” donated by a neighbor

Stage backdrop: Old book painted black, then pasted background graphics I created on to it

Front and Back of the book: pasted graphics of “Omelet” title and of William Shakespeare with “No rubberChickens were harmeth…”

Capes and tunics: sewn from recycled materials (cotton, silk, suede) from my arts and crafts box

Props: Graphics of tombstones printed and then cut out. Omelet holds a broken eggshell in his hand.  Bookmark made from recycled gold ribbon and a feather

I really love to play with words and after the project was done I regretted not calling my project “Sheggspeare’s Omelet.”  I also regretted not calling Horatio by “Horeggio.”  At the time I made the project, I figured “Omelet” and “Yolkick” was plenty and using more would have been overkill.

This project was so much fun, I actually made a short 1.25 minute video and entitled it “Sheggspeare’s Omelet” where I did use Horeggio. Here’s the link below if you wish to view it.  Please watch it through the credits which is where you will really see my love of playing with words. 😉

Enjoy!  Hope you have had an “egg”cellent time!

The Case of the Missing “Groom” Clothespin Doll

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In May of this year, I posted my “Bride and Groom” clothespin dolls. The actual bride and groom loved these representations so much, they displayed them at their reception on the table next to their wedding cake.

While unpacking wedding gifts at their home, they discovered the bride doll was groomless on her stand. 😩

A big search ensued but after several weeks, the groom doll was no where to be found.

I felt so bad for the bride and groom, I told them I would make them another groom doll.  I also said as I use recycled materials, the doll would not be exactly the same as the original.  While remaking the groom, I decided not to make the dark lines around his eyes.

So here he is!

New Groom

Groom
Hair: Yellow feather from an old boa.

Suit Jacket: Old black ribbon wrapped around pipe cleaner.

White Shirt & Cuffs: Old white ribbon.

Slacks: Colored on with a black marker.

Enjoy!

P.S. After the bride and groom returned from their honeymoon, the original groom doll was found wrapped in tissue paper amongst a box of wedding gifts. They still don’t know how the groom doll got separated from the bride doll on their stand but they are happy he was found.

CASE SOLVED! 🙂

JUMPING DEER Weathervane

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Another one of my husband’s beautiful folk art weathervane carvings.

Pattern taken from “Carving Early American Weathervanes” by Anthony Hillman (Dover publications).

Jumping Deer: carved from recycled oak and then stained.

Hooves: black paint.

Inside ears and under tail: white paint.

Antlers: copper sheet with verdigris solution applied for patina.

Eyes: upholstery tacks with verdigris solution applied for patina.

Measurements: 18.5 inches x 11 inches (includes antlers), 3/4 inch thickness

Enjoy!

FLYING SNOW GOOSE Weathervane

Flying Snow Goose in painted pine

Another one of my husband’s beautiful folk art weathervane carvings.

Pattern taken from “Carving Early American Weathervanes” by Anthony Hillman (Dover publications).

Flying Snow Goose is carved from recycled pine and then painted (this design can also be painted to represent any of several other species of goose).

Measurements: 11.25 inches x 10.25 inches, 3/4 inch thickness

Enjoy!

BALD EAGLE Weathervane

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In the spirit of the Fourth of July, I thought the Bald Eagle weathervane my husband carved would be appropriate to post for the occasion.

Among many patriotic weathervane motifs, the eagle was popular everywhere.

Pattern taken from “Carving Early American Weathervanes” by Anthony Hillman (Dover publications).

The Bald Eagle is carved from recycled pine and then painted

The Bald Eagle measures: 12 inches x 10.5 inches, 3/4 inch thickness

Have a Safe and Happy 4th!

Enjoy!

DEXTER (Horse) Weathervane

“Dexter” in oak

Another one of my husband’s beautiful folk art weathervane carvings.

This profile of Dexter, a famous trotter featured in a Currier & Ives lithograph, was popular with 19th century weathervane makers.

Pattern taken from “Carving Early American Weathervanes” by Anthony Hillman (Dover publications).

Dexter is carved from recycled oak with a clear stain finish

Dexter measures: 17.5 inches x 8.5 inches, 3/4 inch thickness

Old recycled upholstery tacks were used for his eyes

Enjoy!

ROOSTER (WEATHERCOCK) Weathervane

Carved Rooster/Weathercock Weathervane (painted pine)

HAPPY FATHER’S DAY!

Another one of my husband’s beautiful folk art weathervane carvings.

The Rooster/Weathercock measures:
16″ w x 10.5″ h
3/4 inch thickness

Verdigris color paint on yellow pine to simulate a copper patina.

Pattern taken from “Carving Early American Weathervanes” by Anthony Hillman (Dover Publications).

Enjoy!

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